Share

‘You Have To Try’: Puerto Ricans, Without Power, Find Ways Forward

Edwin Delgado Rivera stands behind a opposite of his oyster shed in Loiza, Puerto Rico, that postulated complicated repairs by a mortal trail of Hurricane Maria.

Angel Valentin for NPR


hide caption

toggle caption

Angel Valentin for NPR

Edwin Delgado Rivera stands behind a opposite of his oyster shed in Loiza, Puerto Rico, that postulated complicated repairs by a mortal trail of Hurricane Maria.

Angel Valentin for NPR

Outside of his tiny business on a side of a highway in a tiny city in Loiza, Puerto Rico, Santiago Quiñones adjusts a tiny solar panel.

It’s charging a floodlight, to irradiate a close space during night. He takes it down and demonstrates how it works. “You can’t see right now since it’s daylight, though it’s already charged,” he says in Spanish.

Like everybody else in Puerto Rico, 73-year-old Quiñones has mislaid entrance to a energy grid. His residence was also badly shop-worn by floodwaters when Hurricane Maria swept over a island.

Santiago Quiñones Escalera, 73, sits on an atmosphere mattress he and his mother are sleeping on in Loiza , Puerto Rico, that postulated complicated repairs by a mortal trail of Hurricane Maria. Quiñones owns a bar/restaurant in front of a sea and he motionless he and his mother should float a charge out there. Fortunately a building hold up. They use a generator and solar-powered lighting.

Angel Valentin for NPR


hide caption

toggle caption

Angel Valentin for NPR

So he and his mother are vital opposite a street, regulating a bed set adult in his shop, that survived a charge with comparatively teenager damage. They have a generator powering, among other things, a TV in their temporary bedroom. And to assistance see during night there’s a solar row and some rechargeable battery-powered lights.

They bought a light 3 months ago “for a storms,” Quiñones says. They’d listened it could be a dangerous whirly deteriorate this year.

All over a island, people are confronting a severe charge of recuperating from a repairs wrought by Maria — and concurrently grappling with a energy outage that won’t be over for weeks during a least.

In a streets of Loiza and Rio Grande, municipalities usually easterly of San Juan, a daunting scale of a problem is easy to see.

Loading…

Power lines hook dangerously opposite coastal roads. Dozens of wooden write poles, in a continual line, have defeated to a ground. Concrete energy poles have snapped totally in half.

The outcome on a island is manifest from space — during night, Puerto Rico has left dark. The usually light comes from buildings with generators.

And inside a dim spots on a map, people are perplexing to cope with whatever they have left.

Fisherman Justino Rodriguez Rivera, 53, washes garments with H2O from a good in Loiza, Puerto Rico, that postulated complicated repairs by a mortal trail of Hurricane Maria. Rodriguez and his mother evacuated to their church.

Angel Valentin for NPR


hide caption

toggle caption

Angel Valentin for NPR

Fisherman Justino Rodriguez Rivera, 53, washes garments with H2O from a good in Loiza, Puerto Rico, that postulated complicated repairs by a mortal trail of Hurricane Maria. Rodriguez and his mother evacuated to their church.

Angel Valentin for NPR

In Torrecilla Baja, in Loiza, fisherman Justino Rodriguez Rivera, 56, is soaking garments — by palm — outward his daughter’s house. His possess home was broken in a hurricane, a roof ripped off completely.

“My clothes, my wife’s clothes,” he says in Spanish. “Trying to save a tiny bit of wardrobe so not all of it goes bad. Imagine that … we mislaid all else.”

He fills another bucket with good H2O and carries it from one bob to another.

A tiny to a south, in Canovanas, late fighting instructor Jose Torres, 72, is sleeping on a chair in his balcony. It’s too prohibited inside a residence though power.

During a trail of Hurricane Maria, Jose Torres kept repositioning a gas mammillae behind him as a H2O rose inside his house. He is a diabetic and mislaid all his drugs when his two-story residence was flooded adult to 7 feet.

Angel Valentin for NPR


hide caption

toggle caption

Angel Valentin for NPR

He mislaid all his medicine when his home flooded. He has diabetes and hasn’t tested his blood sugarine in days. He’s perplexing to eat consistently to keep his blood sugarine in check — though it’s hard, since their stove relied on energy and a food in a fridge all spoiled.

“All a meat, we threw it away. Or — we didn’t chuck it away, we baked it for a dogs,” he said. “The dogs are eating improved than me now,” he says.

“I’ve got some bananas and yautia,” he said, referring to a base unfeeling that grows in a Carribbean. “My sister gave me a gas [stove] and my mother baked rice yesterday,” he said.

Jose Torres’s rearranges some of a photos he was means to save in his home.

Angel Valentin for NPR


hide caption

toggle caption

Angel Valentin for NPR

“The whole [of] Puerto Rico is like this,” he says. “I don’t consider we’re a usually ones like this … We will survive.”

Amparo Ventura is sitting outward her restaurant, Puerta del Mar, in a coastal city of Piñones. She had a plan. She has a generator and adequate fuel to final for days. But that’s not adequate to move circuitously residents, many of whom have mislaid cars or miss fuel, venturing out on a sand-covered highway along a coast.

The usually people in a parking lot are employees clearing divided debris.

Jose Torres’s backyard after Hurricane Maria.

Angel Valentin for NPR


hide caption

toggle caption

Angel Valentin for NPR

The hardest thing after a storm, Ventura said, was that she didn’t have any work to offer her employees, and couldn’t compensate them.

“I wish them to have a income for their families.” she said. “This week we did a impossible,” she says — that is, they opened. “But it was hard.”

Now, her generator is running. Her lights were on. Her doors were open for anybody who could make it.

“I’m here trying,” she said.

“There aren’t many customers, though we have to try.”

Desperation In Puerto Rican Town Where 60 Percent Are Now Homeless

Puerto Rico's Arecibo Radio Telescope Suffers Hurricane Damage

Cut Off From The World, Puerto Ricans Search For A Ghost Of A Signal