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With A Wedding Dress Comes A New Beginning For A Syrian Tailor



MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Here’s a really opposite story about fashion, nonetheless it has to be pronounced for many people a marriage dress is many some-more than a square of clothing. It’s a absolute pitch of culture, of family, new beginnings. And for one Syrian interloper newly resettled, a marriage dress also represents his family’s destiny in America, one that began with a sewing machine. Carmel Delshad of WAMU shares this story.

CARMEL DELSHAD, BYLINE: If there’s one thing many brides are picky about, it’s a marriage dress.

OMAMA ALTALEB: we wanted a kind of classical selected character dress with all lace.

DELSHAD: That’s Omama Altaleb, a 23-year-old publisher and bride-to-be. She searched high and low for a dress that was select and medium and didn’t mangle a bank.

ALTALEB: It was really formidable to find something that would fit my physique and during a same time cover it.

DELSHAD: Then she met Nader Briman. Briman is a master dressmaker. He and his family are refugees from Syria. They arrived in Jan after vital in Egypt for 5 years.

(SOUNDBITE OF SEWING MACHINE WHIRRING)

NADER BRIMAN: (Through interpreter) we had 75 machines like this in my bureau in Syria.

DELSHAD: Briman doesn’t pronounce English, though he tells me he ran a slip bureau in Homs, Syria. After a fight pennyless out, he and his family fled to Egypt, where he began sewing marriage dresses.

BRIMAN: (Through interpreter) It runs in my blood. If we took a blood exam you’d find slip and marriage dresses.

DELSHAD: A northern Virginia-based nonprofit called Mosaic helped a Briman family settle in. The organisation collected donations to buy Briman a 250-pound industrial sewing appurtenance and afterwards uploaded a photos of his work on Facebook. And that’s where Altaleb saw them. After that, she says she knew accurately where to go to get her dream marriage dress.

ALTALEB: He has an bargain of what Muslim girls, hijabi girls are going for since he has that imagination from Syria, from Egypt.

DELSHAD: Briman assured Altaleb to go for a some-more complicated creamy robe instead of a normal sheer white one.

BRIMAN: (Through interpreter) Off-white has a possess beauty and uniqueness. White has turn a small dated. Like, my grandmother’s era wore it.

DELSHAD: It’s taken Briman about a month to make this dress. But for him and his family, it could be some-more than only a marriage gown. It could be a pivotal to a tolerable future.

BRIMAN: (Through interpreter) This is my initial dress in America, of course, and God peaceful there will be some-more dresses in a future. we have an thought for a try and hopefully it’ll work out.

DELSHAD: And now, after weeks of behind and forth, he finally gets to uncover a finished robe to Altaleb.

ALTALEB: Oh, wow. Wow. This is so nice.

DELSHAD: Are we carrying a moment?

ALTALEB: (Laughter).

DELSHAD: Altaleb’s robe is bright by sequins and little pearls. A scalloped edging neckline leads to some-more clusters of lace. She can’t clean a grin off her face.

ALTALEB: (Laughter) we only – we adore a dress. And when we try it on we get that, like, tingly feeling, like oh, my God, I’m removing married and this is my dress.

DELSHAD: She kindly touches a edging on her gown.

ALTALEB: Can we wear it (laughter)?

DELSHAD: Lifting a sight and holding it all in, Briman looks on with pride.

BRIMAN: (Through interpreter) we wish we can grasp what we achieved in Syria – that we have my possess business, that my children have a good destiny and they grasp their dreams. And we trust in America they will get their chance.

DELSHAD: And if there’s anything that’s a good feeling for a new beginning, it’s a marriage dress.

ALTALEB: we adore it.

DELSHAD: For NPR News, I’m Carmel Delshad in Hyattsville, Md.

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