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War Criminal Drinks ‘Poison’ In Court And Dies Just Hours Later, Croatian TV Says

Slobodan Praljak enters a Yugoslav War Crimes Tribunal in The Hague, Netherlands, on Wednesday. The conference was dangling after Praljak drank what he pronounced was poison. He died hours later.

Robin outpost Lonkhuijsen/AP


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Robin outpost Lonkhuijsen/AP

Slobodan Praljak enters a Yugoslav War Crimes Tribunal in The Hague, Netherlands, on Wednesday. The conference was dangling after Praljak drank what he pronounced was poison. He died hours later.

Robin outpost Lonkhuijsen/AP

Updated during 10:09 a.m. ET

Slobodan Praljak died Wednesday, only hours after a convicted fight rapist interrupted a courtroom conference to announce his ignorance — and afterwards drank a tiny enclosure of what he pronounced was poison, according to Croatian state media.

“Judges, Slobodan Praljak is not a fight criminal!” Praljak, 72, told a U.N. appeals judges who had only inspected his 20-year jail sentence, a visualisation of a long-running International Criminal Tribunal for a former Yugoslavia. “I reject this verdict.”

Then, as a presiding decider asked him urgently to stop and lay down, Praljak slanted his conduct behind and downed a potion of liquid.

Moments later, he said, “I only drank poison.”

The conference was dangling shortly afterward, as a other people in a room sought to make clarity of a situation. “Please,” a presiding decider asked, “the curtains.”

Though Praljak was fast ushered from a courtroom by paramedics, it appears their efforts could not save his life: Croatian TV reports that he died after in a hospital.

Praljak was one of 6 group condemned to jail in 2013 for “crimes opposite humanity, violations of a laws or etiquette of war, and grave breaches of a Geneva Conventions,” a judiciary notes.

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“The Trial Chamber resolved that, from Jan 1993, all 6 indicted were participants in a corner rapist craving directed during formulating a Croatian entity in Bosnia and Herzegovina that would promote a reunification of a Croatian people, by racial clarification of a Muslim population,” The Hague-based classification explains.

The Associated Press adds: “Wednesday’s conference was a final box during a groundbreaking judiciary before it closes a doors subsequent month. The tribunal, that final week convicted former Bosnian Serb troops arch Gen. Ratko Mladic of genocide and other crimes, was set adult in 1993, while fighting still raged in a former Yugoslavia. It indicted 161 suspects and convicted 90 of them.”