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Video Shows North Korean Soldier’s Dramatic Sprint Across Border

Newly expelled closed-circuit radio footage shows a North Korean infantryman sprinting south opposite a limit final week while his associate soldiers glow on him.

Screengrab by NPR/United Nations Command


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Screengrab by NPR/United Nations Command

Newly expelled closed-circuit radio footage shows a North Korean infantryman sprinting south opposite a limit final week while his associate soldiers glow on him.

Screengrab by NPR/United Nations Command

The closed-circuit radio footage is silent, though that creates it no reduction dramatic.

A jeep speeds by a North Korean countryside, channel what is famous as a 72-Hour Bridge.

Inside a car is a North Korean soldier, creation a unfortunate escape. All though a headlights disappear behind tree cover.

The video changes. We see North Korean soldiers using from their posts.

The video shifts again. The jeep is stranded in a ditch. The motorist leaps from it, and he sprints south underneath gunfire from his associate soldiers. In a detached frame, we see him run opposite a border.

In pursuit, a North Korean infantryman also runs opposite a border. He looks down and seems to comprehend what he has done. He turns around and dodges behind a building on a North Korean side.

The part transpired on Nov. 13 in a Joint Security Area, according to The Associated Press.

Infrared video shows South Korean soldiers 40 mins later, crawling toward a defector, who lies bleeding about 55 yards south of a border. They drag him to safety; he is afterwards taken aboard a U.S. Black Hawk troops helicopter and rushed into medicine during a sanatorium nearby Seoul.

The Joint Security Area is a usually apportionment of a limit where soldiers from a dual countries mount usually feet detached — and so is one of a usually areas where a scurry opposite is feasible, The New York Times reports. The final time a North Korean infantryman defected opposite a Joint Security Area was 2007.

Footage of a occurrence was expelled this week by a American-led United Nations Command, that administers a site on a southern side of a border. The Joint Security Area lies within a Demilitarized Zone.

The U.N. Command pronounced that it had finished a review of a occurrence and that a North Korean army had disregarded a U.N. Armistice Agreement twice: by banishment weapons opposite a limit and when a North Korean infantryman quickly crossed a limit chasing a defector.

Gen. Vincent Brooks, a American who leads a U.N. Command, pronounced in a matter antiquated Tuesday that a corps acted “in a demeanour that is unchanging with a Armistice Agreement, namely — to honour a Demilitarized Zone and to take actions that deter a resumption of hostilities. The truce agreement was challenged, though it stays in place.”

The fugitive is being identified usually with a surname Oh, according to Reuters. In a gunfire during his escape, he was shot 5 times.

Dr. Lee Cook-jong, a surgeon who treated Oh after his escape, told outlets, including a Times, that when doctors achieved medicine on a his abdominal wounds, they found parasitic worms 11 inches long.

“In my 20 years as a surgeon, we have usually seen something like this in a medical textbook,” Lee said.

But a Times reports that a parasites should come as no surprise:

“Defectors to a South have cited a existence of parasites and deplorable nutrition. Because it lacks chemical fertilizers, North Korea still relies on tellurian excrement to fertilize a fields, assisting parasites to spread, a experts said.

“In a 2014 study, South Korean doctors checked a representation of 17 womanlike defectors from North Korea and found 7 of them putrescent with parasitic worms.”

Lee told a news discussion on Wednesday that a male had regained alertness and was now stable.

“He is fine,” Lee said, according to Reuters. “He’s not going to die.”