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Thai Premier To Reporters: Talk To The Cardboard Cut-Out

In this picture from video, Thailand’s Prime Minister Prayuth Chan-ocha (left) waves and walks off as a life-sized card cut-out figure of himself is placed subsequent to a microphone during a media discussion in Bangkok on Monday.

TPBS/AP


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In this picture from video, Thailand’s Prime Minister Prayuth Chan-ocha (left) waves and walks off as a life-sized card cut-out figure of himself is placed subsequent to a microphone during a media discussion in Bangkok on Monday.

TPBS/AP

Thai Prime Minister Prayuth Chan-ocha — whose family with a country’s news media have enclosed melancholy reporters with execution (a joke, he explained later) — has found a new proceed to traffic with worried questions: on Monday, he had a life-sized card cutout of himself propped in front of reporters and walked away.

As he did so, a former army arch who seized energy from an inaugurated supervision 3 years ago, waved and educated journalists: “If we wish to ask any questions on politics or conflict, ask this guy.”

It’s not a initial time, The Associated Press notes, that Prayuth has left a media dumfounded: “In a past he has fondled a ear of a sound technician for several mins during an unpretentious news conference, flung a banana flay during cameramen, and threatened, with what he called plain-spoken humor, to govern any publisher who criticized his government.”

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Since seizing power, Prayuth’s supervision has betrothed several times to reason elections — usually to regularly check them.

As NPR’s Merrit Kennedy reported final April, a new structure pushed by by Prayuth’s supervision and authorized by Thai electorate “paves a approach for Thailand to reason elections in a entrance months, though critics contend it usually solidifies a energy of a military.”

The latest guarantee is for elections to be hold in November.

In a news published months after a 2014 coup, U.S.-based Human Rights Watch described a conditions in Thailand underneath Prayuth as an “apparently unfounded pit” where “criticism is evenly prosecuted, domestic activity is banned, media is censored, and dissidents are attempted in troops courts.”