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Spain’s Prime Minister Asks For Direct-Rule Authority Over Catalonia

Spain’s Prime Minister Mariano Rajoy, center, is applauded after a debate during a Senate in Madrid, Spain, on Friday in that he appealed to a country’s Senate to extend special management to disintegrate Catalonia’s informal government.

Paul White/AP


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Paul White/AP

Spain’s Prime Minister Mariano Rajoy, center, is applauded after a debate during a Senate in Madrid, Spain, on Friday in that he appealed to a country’s Senate to extend special management to disintegrate Catalonia’s informal government.

Paul White/AP

Spain’s Prime Minister Mariano Rajoy has asked a country’s Senate for a energy to levy approach order over secessionist Catalonia and says he would use it initial to overthrow a region’s president.

Rajoy delivered an ardent debate to shrill acclaim in a chamber, insisting that Catalonia’s stipulation of liberty is “a transparent defilement of a laws, of democracy, of a rights of all, and that has consequences.”

The Spanish premier pronounced he would immediately boot Catalan President Carles Puigdemont if a Senate authorized invoking Article 155 of Spain’s Constitution, permitting it to revoke Catalonia’s autonomy.

Meanwhile, in Barcelona, thousands of protesters collected nearby a informal council fluttering flags and chanting “freedom” as informal lawmakers debated a grave stipulation of independence.

On Thursday, Puidgemont pronounced no to a informal selecting that competence have helped to ease tensions with Madrid.

As we have created previously: “Catalonia, that includes a city of Barcelona and is one of Spain’s wealthiest and many culturally graphic regions, voted overwhelmingly on Oct. 1 to mutiny from Spain. Puigdemont afterwards announced liberty though dangling it in scarcely a same exhale while job for talks with Madrid. Catalan lawmakers also upheld articles of secession.”

And NPR’s Chris Benderev writes:

“The referendum went 90 percent in preference of independence, though with usually about half of purebred electorate branch out. Massive travel protests in preference of togetherness came a week after a vote.”

Spanish courts had already ruled a selecting illegal, and Spain’s military countered pro-independence forces, in some cases violently, in an bid to stop a vote. … More than one deadline for a construction came and went with Puigdemont instead selecting an changeable stance: He admitted he now hexed a “mandate” to mutiny though was immediately pausing liberty efforts to concede for talks.”