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Russian Lawmakers Approve New Restrictions On Foreign Media

Russian lawmakers in a State Duma extol after voting Wednesday to concede a supervision to register general media outlets as unfamiliar agents.

Alexander Zemlianichenko/AP


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Alexander Zemlianichenko/AP

Russian lawmakers in a State Duma extol after voting Wednesday to concede a supervision to register general media outlets as unfamiliar agents.

Alexander Zemlianichenko/AP

Russia’s State Duma has adopted restrictions on unfamiliar media outlets, days after a U.S. Justice Department forced a Russian TV station’s prolongation association to register as a unfamiliar representative handling in a U.S.

“A sum of 409 lawmakers out of 450 voted for a amendments, no one voted opposite them or abstained,” Russian state media Tass reported.

Passage of a magnitude in a State Duma, Russia’s reduce residence of parliament, came days after a association behind TV channel RT America filed paperwork underneath a U.S. Foreign Agents Registration Act of 1938.

Announcing a registration this week, a Justice Department said, “Americans have a right to know who is behaving in a United States to change a U.S. supervision or open on interest of unfamiliar principals.”

In a filing, a association pronounced that while it gets a “substantial” volume of a income from Russia’s government, it does not try to change domestic discourse.

From Moscow, NPR’s Lucian Kim reports:

“Critics contend a changes could have a chilling outcome on reporters operative in Russia, only as identical legislation had on nongovernmental organizations.

“The top residence of council is approaching to give a stamp of capitulation subsequent week and send a check on to a Kremlin for President Vladimir Putin to sign.”

Presidential press secretary Dmitry Peskov pronounced after a bill’s thoroughfare by one cover of parliament, “Any intrusion on a leisure of Russian media abroad is not and won’t be left but a clever defamation and a tit-for-tat response of Moscow,” according to Tass.

In Russia, a unfamiliar representative tag “would request if a opening is possibly purebred abroad, receives unfamiliar appropriation or gets paid by a Russian association that is itself financed from abroad,” The Moscow Times reports.

Under a new law, Russia’s media watchdog, Roskomnadzor, would be means to “immediately retard websites,” Tass reports.