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PHOTOS: The Sahara Desert, Painted White With Snow

A stage of snow, striped in orange: This is how a dried surrounding Ain Sefra in Algeria seemed to residents for a few passing hours Sunday.

Zineddine Hashas/Geoff Robinson


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Zineddine Hashas/Geoff Robinson

A stage of snow, striped in orange: This is how a dried surrounding Ain Sefra in Algeria seemed to residents for a few passing hours Sunday.

Zineddine Hashas/Geoff Robinson

For a few passing hours Sunday, people perched in a dull heights of northwest Algeria held steer of something frequency seen: a Sahara Desert, hidden in white. Residents of Ain Sefra, a tiny city surrounded by a Atlas Mountains of Northern Africa, walked outward to find a powdering of sleet underfoot — and some-more than a feet of it crowding a town’s outdoor boundaries.

While it’s not unheard of — sleet visited this landscape in Dec 2016, after all — a wintry continue is indeed singular for a region: As NPR’s Maggie Penman forked out during a time, a final vital layer in Ain Sefra before that happened behind in 1979.

It was no small flurry that strike a area. In some tools of a segment surrounding Ain Sefra, as many as 16 inches of sleet fell Sunday.

Karim Bouchetata/Geoff Robinson


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Karim Bouchetata/Geoff Robinson

But, as Forbes noted, a doubtful winter wonderland was not alone in experiencing impassioned continue this past week — and indeed, it came about given of peculiar patterns elsewhere:

“The easterly seashore of a United States continues to face a brutally cold winter charge Grayson and Sydney, Australia swelters in a hottest temperatures seen in scarcely 80 years during 116.6 degrees Farenheight.

“High pressures over Europe caused cold atmosphere to be pulled down into northern Africa and into a Sahara Desert. This mass of cold atmosphere rose 3,280 feet to a betterment of Ain Sefra, a city surrounded by a Atlas Mountains, and began to sleet early Sunday morning.”

Still, a stage Sunday was not to last.

By late afternoon, a dunes’ blazing orange and red had reasserted themselves over a surrounding palette, as rising temperatures forced a sleet to give approach again to sand.

Luckily for some residents, that declining act was not too discerning to hide in a discerning sledding session. And luckily for us, internal photographer Karim Bouchetata managed to constraint a impulse perpetually for folks who happened not to locate it in person.

Here are some of those photographs.

By late afternoon Sunday, a stage had retreated into a standard hues — though not before a sleet was memorialized in a few strange images.

Zineddine Hashas/Geoff Robinson


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Zineddine Hashas/Geoff Robinson

By late afternoon Sunday, a stage had retreated into a standard hues — though not before a sleet was memorialized in a few strange images.

Zineddine Hashas/Geoff Robinson

Ain Sefra is nestled in a heights of a Atlas Mountains in northwestern Algeria.

Karim Bouchetata/Geoff Robinson


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Karim Bouchetata/Geoff Robinson

Ain Sefra is nestled in a heights of a Atlas Mountains in northwestern Algeria.

Karim Bouchetata/Geoff Robinson

Ain Sefra saw sleet final winter, as good — though before 2016, it had been decades given a Algerian city had gifted a vital snowfall.

Karim Bouchetata/Geoff Robinson


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Karim Bouchetata/Geoff Robinson

Ain Sefra saw sleet final winter, as good — though before 2016, it had been decades given a Algerian city had gifted a vital snowfall.

Karim Bouchetata/Geoff Robinson