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PHOTOS: ‘Chicano Eats’ Food Blog Dishes Up Bicultural Flavors

Baked crema Mexicana doughnuts with a blood orange glaze, as featured in a food blog Chicano Eats. On his bilingual blog, Esteban Castillo shares normal and alloy Mexican recipes. The blog has a stunning, minimalist cultured meant to plea a approach people see Mexican food.

Esteban Castillo


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Esteban Castillo

Baked crema Mexicana doughnuts with a blood orange glaze, as featured in a food blog Chicano Eats. On his bilingual blog, Esteban Castillo shares normal and alloy Mexican recipes. The blog has a stunning, minimalist cultured meant to plea a approach people see Mexican food.

Esteban Castillo

Whenever Esteban Castillo visited his grandparents in Colima, Mexico, he’d lay by his grandfather’s taco mount and watch him cook. He’d also see his grandmother lift her homemade cheeses on her behind and go doorway to door, offered them in opposite neighborhoods. To this day, his grandparents still make a vital off of food.

“They fundamentally renovate their vital room into a grill during a weekends to make ends meet,” says Castillo.

Castillo grew adult in Santa Ana, Calif., where some-more than 75 percent of a race is Latino. He says Mexican food was a substructure of his childhood. So when he started to see renouned food blogs benefaction recipes as normal Mexican dishes when they were anything but, it got him riled adult — and encouraged him to filigree his adore for design, cooking and culture.

And, so, Chicano Eats was born. It’s a bicultural and bilingual food blog where Castillo shares normal and alloy Mexican recipes — presented with a overwhelming visible sensibility.

(Left) Tacos de Papa. (Right) “El Vampiro,” a blood orange mezcal margarita.

Esteban Castillo


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Esteban Castillo

His photos have a colourful and frail cultured that simulate his credentials in striking pattern and marketing. He says his colorful, minimalist display is meant to plea a approach people see Mexican food.

“When we consider of Mexican food, we feel like people prognosticate this unequivocally country feeling, where all is in a clay pot and things like that,” Castillo says, adding, “I wanted to give Mexican food this minimalist, unequivocally colorful treatment, since that’s what we always gravitated to when we was in school.”

His visible character is also a approach to plea how Mexican food is mostly viewed in a U.S., he says. “Here in a U.S., Mexican food doesn’t unequivocally reason a lot of clout. A lot of people consider it’s not something we would see during a five-star restaurant. They consider it’s travel food. It’s something we try to fight.”

And when Castillo fuses Mexican flavors with American classics in his recipes, he says it’s a approach to respect his possess upbringing. With innovative dishes like homemade Peeps lonesome with Tajin, a Mexican piquancy brew of chili peppers, salt and lime, and cupcakes done with Chocomil, a powdered chocolate divert dear south of a border, he is literally blending his cultures.

(Left) Chocomíl Cupcakes with a Milk Chocolate Whipped Topping. (Right) Mole Brownie Tart with a Milk Chocolate Ganache.

Esteban Castillo


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Esteban Castillo

“I see it as a curtsy to my bicultural temperament — and how we’ve … enthralled ourselves into this culture, too,” he says.

Castillo says these days, millennials wish to bond with their story and culture. So when he saw a renouned food site’s amicable media pity a recipe that called for regulating a jar of honeyed salsa to make pozole rojo — a normal Mexican soup done with hominy, beef and chilies — he was reminded that context is key.

“If you’ve ever done pozole, or if you’ve ever had pozole, we know that salsa is not used in it. So we was usually kind of like, is anybody doing their research? we feel like nowadays, this is a outrageous square that’s being left out” of a review around food. “Where did things issue and how is it critical to that specific culture?” says Castillo.

Guacamole

Esteban Castillo


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Esteban Castillo

Castillo isn’t a usually one carrying these kind of conversations about food and culture.

When Chefs Become Famous Cooking Other Cultures' Food

Take a new conflict over Kooks Burritos, a Portland, Ore., food pop-up. In an talk with a Willamette Week, a internal alt-weekly newspaper, a dual white American women behind a craving suggested that they schooled how to make a burritos on a outing to Mexico by espionage on all a “tortilla ladies” they would accommodate and barbecuing them for recipe information — clearly though compensating them for their superintendence or disclosing they were profiting from it. The occurrence rekindled a long-running review in a food universe on a purpose of informative allowance in food and restaurants. The recoil was so strong, Kooks closed.

Castillo says it’s critical to know a enlightenment that food comes from.

“It’s such a supportive topic. we feel like if people are going to be articulate about food or creation food that is out of their culture, we feel like [the dishes] usually need to be well-researched and unequivocally compensate reverence to those cultures and respect them.”

(Left) Cucumber slices seasoned with Tajín and orange wedges. (Right) Vegan churros.

Esteban Castillo


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Esteban Castillo

That’s what he tries to do with his creations. At an eventuality a integrate of weeks ago, he was engaged to emanate a cocktail. So he motionless to play with tepache, a pre-Columbian splash from Mexico consisting of fermented pineapple peels and rinds, brownish-red sugarine and cinnamon.

The eventuality captivated a racially and ethnically churned crowd, though he was astounded to learn that many people didn’t know about this ancient drink, and found it an event to emanate conversations on a origins. As for a guest who did commend tepache — mostly Mexicans and Mexican-Americans — he says a libation influenced adult memories of celebration it in Mexico.

Castillo has called his blogging a kind of activism, and he says he hopes to see some-more people of tone take adult food blogging.

“When it comes to food blogging, we would like to see some-more diversity,” he says. “I feel like when it comes to other ethnicities blogging, we don’t have that representation.”

And he says that now is a best time to uncover that representation. “People aren’t fearful to voice their opinions or feelings on things. Our voice is unequivocally entrance out to a spotlight. It’s a time.”