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On Top Of Hong Kong’s High Rises, Rooftop Gardens Take Root

Rooftop Republic’s Pol Fàbrega (left) and Andrew Tsui mount with customer Gina Ma (center) amid a rooftop garden of a French grill in executive Hong Kong.

Deena Prichep for NPR


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Deena Prichep for NPR

Rooftop Republic’s Pol Fàbrega (left) and Andrew Tsui mount with customer Gina Ma (center) amid a rooftop garden of a French grill in executive Hong Kong.

Deena Prichep for NPR

On a standard retard in Hong Kong, thousands of people live on tip of any other. Pol Fàbrega thinks about all these people as he looks adult during a soaring high rises above a streets. And afterwards he thinks about all that space above all these people.

“The block footage here is impossibly expensive,” says Fàbrega, staring upwards. “But yet, if we demeanour during Hong Kong from above, it’s full of dull rooftops.”

It is, he says, a large event for growth.

Fàbrega is not a developer. In a city full of bankers, he’s a gardener. He helps run a gardening mild called Rooftop Republic that aims to make a best use out of Hong Kong’s thousands of roofs.

“In Hong Kong, now there’re around 700 hectares of farmland that are being farmed,” explains Fàbrega, “So a volume of rooftop space is roughly a same as a volume we’re regulating currently to plantation – like, tangible farmland.”

Hong Kong’s rural grant to a GDP is 0.02 percent. Fàbrega’s idea is to boost that little series by stuffing Hong Kong’s 1,500 acres of rooftop space with unfeeling gardens.

He’s starting small, by giving tutorials to city residents. On a roof of Fringe, a French grill in Hong Kong’s Central district, Fàbrega and Rooftop Republic co-founder Andrew Tsui give a debate of garden containers full of Romaine lettuce, kale, cherry tomatoes, and carrots.

Rooftop Republic has helped fill some-more than 26,000 block feet of rooftop on 22 rooftop farms. The biggest one is on a roof of Hong Kong airline Cathay Pacific, where 40 employees conduct enclosure unfeeling plots on a daily basis.

Expat proprietor Gina Ma’s rooftop garden is little by comparison, though she’s swelling a word during her children’s school. “I was like Johnny Appleseed. we was job everybody up, called a propagandize and we was like, ‘I have seedlings they’re amazing! And they’re all, like, organic and things that we can’t get here. Take them!’ “

It’s that final point, being organic and healthy, that’s critical to Rooftop Republic’s clients. “In a box of Hong Kong, we also face a sold plea that 98 percent of a vegetables and fruits come from China,” Fàbrega says. “There’s unconstrained volume of scandals surrounding food that’s from mainland China.”

And that’s because Rooftop Republic’s initial clients were a handful of restaurants and hotels in a city where returning to a land can be as elementary as a discerning outing adult a stairs to a roof.