Share

John Avildsen, Oscar-Winning Director Of ‘Rocky’ And ‘Karate Kid,’ Dies At 81

John Avildsen shows off a best executive Oscar he won in 1977 for Rocky. Avildsen, who also destined The Karate Kid, died Friday from pancreatic cancer during a age of 81 in Los Angeles.

Pendergrass/AP


hide caption

toggle caption

Pendergrass/AP

John Avildsen shows off a best executive Oscar he won in 1977 for Rocky. Avildsen, who also destined The Karate Kid, died Friday from pancreatic cancer during a age of 81 in Los Angeles.

Pendergrass/AP

John Avildsen, a male behind a camera for a fibre of dear blockbusters in a 1970s and ’80s, died Friday during a age of 81. The Oscar-winning executive of Rocky and The Karate Kid died of pancreatic cancer in LA, his son Anthony told a Los Angeles Times.

“His iconic Rocky … has been lionized via a enlightenment as a quintessential loser story — a repeated thesis in his important physique of work that enclosed Save a Tiger and The Karate Kid franchise,” Paris Barclay, boss of a Directors Guild of America, pronounced in a matter Friday.

“Throughout a decades,” Barclay continued, “his rousing portrayals of victory, bravery and tension prisoner a hearts of generations of Americans.”

Sylvester Stallone — who starred in Rocky, a film that warranted Avildsen his best directing Oscar and won best design in 1977 — also posted a reverence to a executive behind his iconic role: “I’m certain we will shortly be directing Hits in Heaven.”

The good executive John G. Avildsen Who won a Oscar for directing Rocky! R. I. P. I’m certain we will shortly be directing Hits in Heaven- Thank we , Sly

A post common by Sly Stallone (@officialslystallone) on Jun 16, 2017 during 8:00pm PDT

He went on to have a fibre of big-screen successes in a decade to come, both during a box bureau and on a awards stage. He destined a initial 3 films in The Karate Kid franchise, that non-stop with a initial film in 1984.

Mr. Miyagi, a coach impression to a bullied pretension figure of that film, “was a ideal broker father that everybody wished they had,” Avildsen told The Baltimore Sun final year. “He was wise, he was generous, he was funny. He was a angel godmother. And [actor] Pat Morita brought him to life, he was ideal. Who could be better?”

But for Ralph Macchio, a actor who played Miyagi’s mentee, lauded Avildsen as a loyal inspirational force behind a fiction. “He brought inspirational stories to us all and had a running palm in changing my life,” Macchio tweeted.

Avildsen wasn’t simply a weaver of fictions. In 1983, he also warranted an Oscar assignment for his short-subject documentary Traveling Hopefully, a form of Roger Baldwin, co-founder of a ACLU.