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‘I Got It Wrong,’ U.S. Ambassador Says About Muslim ‘No-Go Zones’ In The Netherlands

U.S. Ambassador to a Netherlands Pete Hoekstra spoke during a moving news discussion with Dutch reporters Wednesday during The Hague. On Friday, he pronounced progressing anti-Muslim comments were “wrong.”

Robin Van Lonkhuijsen/AFP/Getty Images


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Robin Van Lonkhuijsen/AFP/Getty Images

U.S. Ambassador to a Netherlands Pete Hoekstra spoke during a moving news discussion with Dutch reporters Wednesday during The Hague. On Friday, he pronounced progressing anti-Muslim comments were “wrong.”

Robin Van Lonkhuijsen/AFP/Getty Images

The new U.S. envoy to a Netherlands has pronounced anti-Muslim comments he done in 2015 were “just wrong,” dual days after a news discussion when he wouldn’t contend a comments were factually inaccurate.

Pete Hoekstra, a former Republican congressman from Michigan who was allocated to a envoy position by President Trump, talked in 2015 about a “Islamic movement” being obliged for “no-go zones” and a blazing of cars and politicians in a Netherlands:

“Chaos in a Netherlands. There are cars being burned. There are politicians that are being burned. … With a liquid of a Islamic village — and yes, there are no-go zones in a Netherlands.”

Hoekstra was vocalization during a Nov 2015 discussion orderly by a regressive David Horowitz Freedom Center.

But on Friday, he told a Dutch journal De Telegraaf, “That one repelled me personally. … While we know there have been other issues in other countries in Europe, we know that has never been a resources here. That was a wrong statement. That was only wrong.” The English-language mention of Hoekstra’s talk was published by Reuters and other news agencies Friday.

According to an mention published by The Guardian, Hoekstra said, “I got countries churned up. we got it wrong, and we don’t know how it could have happened.”

Hoekstra has formerly pronounced he “expressed my regrets and my reparation for a comments that we made,” yet stopped brief of observant a explain was factually false.

Hoekstra had an worried news discussion with Dutch reporters on Wednesday after they regularly pulpy him to explain or redress a 2015 comments. He pronounced he “expressed my regrets and my reparation for a comments that we made. And I’m not revisiting a issue.” Hoekstra eventually stopped responding to questions.

As The Two-Way reported Friday, a State Department sought to stretch itself from Hoekstra’s 2015 comments on Thursday, yet it also stopped brief of job them wrong:

” ‘The State Department does not determine with those statements. That is not a denunciation that we would use,’ a State Department’s undersecretary for open tact and open affairs, Steve Goldstein, told reporters in Washington on Thursday.”