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How To Succeed In Business After Fleeing For Your Life

Modu Churi, who fled his encampment to shun Boko Haram final year, now earns a vital by charging cellphones for replaced persons in northeast Nigeria.

Jide Adeniyi-Jones for NPR


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Jide Adeniyi-Jones for NPR

Modu Churi, who fled his encampment to shun Boko Haram final year, now earns a vital by charging cellphones for replaced persons in northeast Nigeria.

Jide Adeniyi-Jones for NPR

Imagine a misfortune has happened to your family. You’ve been forced to rush your home.

You eventually make it to safety. But now you’re vital in a stay for replaced persons.

You don’t wish to only count on handouts. So how do we make a living?

That’s what happened final year to 43-year-old Modu Churi, a father of 7 from Mijigini encampment in Borno state in a northeast of Nigeria, a segment blighted by assault during Boko Haram’s eight-year insurgency. Now they live during Muna Customs House stay in Maiduguri, a categorical city in northeast Nigeria, along with some-more than a million and a half people uprooted by a fighting.

The Little Boy Who Escaped From Boko Haram

In his village, Churi warranted a vital by charging and offered phones. He indispensable a new source of income.

What It's Like To Come Home After Fleeing From Boko Haram

And afterwards it clicked — he could try a identical startup in a camp.

He beheld that people who had mislaid roughly all still had their cellphones and a few smartphones.

“So we decided, OK, let me start adult a small business and we suspicion about opening adult a phone-charging point,” says Churi, vocalization in Hausa, a lingua franca of northern Nigeria.

He says he used his life assets of about $160 to squeeze a generator and set adult what has incited into a viable small enterprise. The generator is essential, since energy cuts are common in Maiduguri.

Churi is a high male who towers over his temporary booth. He’s set adult emporium in a stairwell of an unprepared three-story section building that’s been taken over by persons who are displaced. He displays a few handsets for sale, and colorful accessories to attract customers.

From half a building up, we demeanour down on an array of mostly old-style cellphones splayed out on a dry floor, plugged into an adapter fueled by a generator for a charge.

The stairwell where Modu Churi has set adult his cellphone charging booth.

Ofeibea Quist-Arcton/NPR


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Ofeibea Quist-Arcton/NPR

Churi charges to assign a phones, earning income to demeanour after his family.

Three small boys look out from underneath a case as Churi tells his story. “Even here in Muna camp, we can acquire income and caring for my family,” he says, looking during a children. “At times, when there’s a marketplace for this business, we assign about 50 phones. At times, adult to a hundred phones a day.”

So how most does it cost to assign a phone? It’s affordable, says Churi, 10 cents per phone. At times, he says with a smile, he creates scarcely $13 a day. “Alhamdulilah. We appreciate God, a marketplace for phone-charging is good,” he says.

Churi dreams of streamer home to Mijigini with his family. “I’m formulation to go behind home. Now we have a generator, so I’ll use it in my encampment — since people will always use cellphones, yah.”

“I trust I’ll do good stability this same business once I’m behind home,” Churi says hopefully, flashing another extended and certain smile.