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Greece Was Hit By Storm Some Called A ‘Medicane.’ What’s That?

Flash floods killed during slightest 20 people in Greece, in a charge some were job a “medicane.” A lady cleans sand in front of a residence in a city of Mandra, northwest of Athens, on Friday.

Angelos Tzortzinis/AFP/Getty Images


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Angelos Tzortzinis/AFP/Getty Images

Flash floods killed during slightest 20 people in Greece, in a charge some were job a “medicane.” A lady cleans sand in front of a residence in a city of Mandra, northwest of Athens, on Friday.

Angelos Tzortzinis/AFP/Getty Images

Flash floods struck Greece final week, murdering during slightest 20 people and deleterious homes and businesses. Greek’s primary apportion announced a duration of inhabitant mourning.

Deadly Floods Devastate Western Greek Cities

Towns on a hinterland of Athens were hardest hit. In a city of Mandra, 12 people died.

“Everything is lost,” pronounced Mandra mayor Yianna Krikouki, according to The Guardian. “The disaster is biblical.”

European continue sites common imagery display a swirling breeze patterns of a charge and a waterspout over Greece.

And some called a charge a “medicane,” definition a Mediterranean hurricane.

Atmospheric scientists during MIT and a Spanish university tangible medicanes in a 2013 paper as “extreme cyclonic windstorms morphologically and physically identical to pleasant cyclones.” The authors remarkable that in further to a nautical origin, a storms seem in satellite images as “vigorous, rarely concentric cloud bands wrapped around a executive eye” and “sea-to-air heatfluxes and implicit feverishness recover within a core of a storm.”

As a forecasting website Weather Underground’s Bob Henson explains, these storms off a southern seashore of Europe share some characteristics of pleasant storms:

“Medicanes aren’t deliberate bone-fide pleasant systems, given a waters of a Mediterranean aren’t endless or comfortable adequate to means a loyal hurricane. And notwithstanding a import embedded in a name, really few medicanes grasp postulated winds as clever as a Category 1 hurricane. However, it’s utterly probable for an existent core of low vigour in a Mediterranean to quickly take on pleasant characteristics, including a symmetric structure and a tiny core of comfortable air.

[M]edicanes rest on colder atmosphere aloft, typically brought in as partial of an upper-level low that decays over a Mediterranean. Wind shear relaxes as a top low decays, and a contrariety between a cold atmosphere aloft and a comparatively comfortable sea aspect temperatures can kindle a arrangement of showers and thunderstorms. These, in turn, might process around a diseased aspect low and assistance give it a symmetric, warm-core structure — and infrequently even a cloud-free, eye-like feature. Often a medicane’s comfortable core will be enveloped within broader cold-core features, that creates it some-more same to a hybrid or subtropical charge than a pleasant storm.

Henson writes that such storms typically rise once or twice a year, customarily in a tumble or winter, and tend to stand adult in dual places: a western Mediterranean, and in a Ionian Sea, southeast of Malta and Italy.

These low-pressure storms are also simply famous as subtropical cyclones, a Weather Channel says, and they share characteristics with both pleasant and non-tropical systems: “a extended breeze margin and generally low-topped thunderstorms replaced from a core of a system. There also are no cold fronts or comfortable fronts.”

So what do we call a charge that strike Greece?

Numa.

That’s a name it was given by a Free University of Berlin, that runs an “Adopt-A-Vortex” program, whereby anyone can compensate to name an arriving high or low vigour system. But no way, José: special characters aren’t allowed, solely for German umlauts.