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Documents Offer Insight Into Soviet View Of JFK Assassination

American Lee Harvey Oswald and his Russian wife, Marina, poise on a overpass travel in Minsk during their stay in a Soviet Union. This is a 1964 welfare print from a Warren Commission.

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American Lee Harvey Oswald and his Russian wife, Marina, poise on a overpass travel in Minsk during their stay in a Soviet Union. This is a 1964 welfare print from a Warren Commission.

AP

Was a Soviet Union concerned in a 1963 assassination of President Kennedy?

Given Cold War tensions and a fact that shooter Lee Harvey Oswald had defected to a Soviet Union and lived there in a years heading adult to a assassination, it’s a doubt that has prolonged intrigued even a softly conspiracy-minded.

Some 2,800 papers expelled by sequence of President Trump on Thursday yield some probable insights into how a assassination was noticed inside a Soviet Union.

That greeting appears to have been one of genuine surprise, as good as regard inside a Communist Party that a murdering of Kennedy competence be partial of a incomparable worried manoeuvre to take over a U.S. government.

In a memo labeled “Top Secret” and antiquated Dec. 1, 1966 from FBI Director J. Edgar Hoover to Marvin Watson, a special partner to President Lyndon Johnson, cites “[a] source who has furnished arguable information in a past and who was in Russia on a date of a assassination …”

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The news, it says “was greeted by good startle and amazement and church bells were tolled in a memory of President Kennedy.”

The memo continues: “According to a source, officials of a Communist Party of a Soviet Union believed there was some well-organized swindling on a partial of a “ultraright” in a United States to outcome a ‘coup.’ They seemed assured that a assassination was not a help of one male though that it arose out of a delicately designed debate in that several people played a part.”

The Soviets were aroused that a assassination would be used to play on “anticommunist sentiments” in a U.S. to “stop negotiations with a Soviet Union, conflict Cuba and afterward widespread war.”

Oswald, a former U.S. Marine, went to a Soviet Union in 1959 and married there. Apparently annoyed with Soviet life, he returned to U.S. dirt reduction than dual years after after apparently perplexing to dedicate suicide.

The FBI memo, citing a unnamed source, says “Soviet officials claimed that Lee Harvey Oswald had no tie whatsoever with a Soviet Union. They described him as a highly-strung insane who was unfriendly to his possess nation and all else.”

The same singular source reported that a KGB, a Soviet comprehension agency, “issued instructions to all of a agents to immediately obtain all information accessible concerning” President Johnson. The memo pronounced that in a months after Kennedy’s death, a KGB had come into “possession of information purporting to prove that President Johnson was obliged for a assassination of a late President John F. Kennedy.”

In a opposite memo, this one from a CIA Director of Security to CIA Headquarters, creatively personal “Secret” and antiquated Mar 11, 1964, refers to a George M. Lesnik, a former KGB representative who was in Moscow on a day of a Kennedy assassination.

After conference a news, he “dashed to his office” to demeanour during Oswald’s file. “When he found a record he reviewed it and found that Oswald had not been used or even approached for use by a Russian intelligence.” Lesnik claimed that he afterwards called others in a KGB who pronounced they were unknowingly that Oswald had been cultivated in any approach before returning to a United States.