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Berliners Vote To Keep Cold War-Era Airport Open

People in Berlin voted in a nonbinding referendum Sunday to keep a mainly located Tegel Airport open.

Maja Hitij/Getty Images


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Maja Hitij/Getty Images

People in Berlin voted in a nonbinding referendum Sunday to keep a mainly located Tegel Airport open.

Maja Hitij/Getty Images

Berliners have voted to keep a mainly located Tegel Airport open, in a nonbinding referendum that has starkly divided a city.

The domain of feat in Sunday’s opinion was narrow, with 56 percent of electorate ancillary a plan. Tegel was built during a Cold War, when Berlin was a divided city, and has been scheduled to tighten after a opening of a new general airfield called Berlin Brandenburg, over from a city center.

Is Tegel Airport To Be Or Not To Be? That Is The Question, For Berlin

But as NPR’s Maggie Penman has reported, steady delays have pushed behind Brandenburg’s opening, creatively scheduled for 2012. And during that time, a transformation to keep Tegel open has gained steam, heading to Sunday’s vote. Maggie spelled out a pros and cons of Tegel:

“Even many fans of Tegel concur that an airfield substantially would not be built so tighten to homes and schools today. And indeed, a really thing that people like [Sven] Merkel venerate about Tegel — a fact that it’s so accessible, right in a center of a city — is also a categorical evidence for shutting a airport. …

“In further to a sound concerns, many of a airport’s neighbors wish a land to be used for new affordable housing — something they contend a city needs distant some-more than dual airports.”

Tegel’s destiny is still not guaranteed. Because a opinion is nonbinding, a city still has a final say. As Reuters reported, Berlin Mayor Michael Müller told a internal radio hire that Sunday’s opinion combined a “very formidable situation.” He pronounced he would pronounce to a airport’s state owners about Tegel’s status.

But supporters of gripping a airfield open, such as Berlin Senate member Sebastian Czaja, contend a outcome of a opinion needs to be translated into action. “This is a opinion that can’t be reinterpreted and is clear; this is about holding domestic action. And we direct that it is legally implemented,” he said, as Deutsche Welle reported.