Share

Beekeepers Benefit From The Hive Mind In Community Apiaries

Beekeepers check bee frames during a Hudson Gardens village apiary nearby Littleton, Colo. Modeled after village gardens, village apiaries concede beekeepers to say hives in open spaces — and offer any tips and support.

Courtesy of Hudson Gardens


hide caption

toggle caption

Courtesy of Hudson Gardens

Beekeepers check bee frames during a Hudson Gardens village apiary nearby Littleton, Colo. Modeled after village gardens, village apiaries concede beekeepers to say hives in open spaces — and offer any tips and support.

Courtesy of Hudson Gardens

Even yet Marca Engman review large books, watched YouTube videos and took a beekeeping category before installing her initial hive in 2012, she knew she’d need assistance in a field.

“The whole thought of beekeeping was overwhelming,” she recalls. “Every year is opposite and any hive is different.”

Rather than operative a backyard beehive solo, Engman commissioned her initial hive in a village apiary during Hudson Gardens, a nonprofit garden nearby Littleton, Colo.

“Beekeeping in a village environment is reduction threatening, since we have support,” Engman says.

Community apiaries like a one during Hudson Gardens are generating a buzz. Modeled after village gardens, a honeyed setups concede beekeepers to say hives in open spaces. Beekeepers generally compensate a tiny price to lease a space though possess a apparatus and conduct a hives, gripping all of a harvested honey.

Although there are no central statistics on a series of village apiaries in a U.S., Tim Tucker, a beekeeper and evident past boss of a American Beekeeping Federation, has witnessed a poignant uptick in a series of communities creation it easier for residents to keep bees during home and in open spaces.

“Community beekeeping is a good idea,” he says.

Pittsburgh was home to a initial village apiary. Burgh Bees non-stop a site in 2010, branch a once-neglected empty lot in an civic area into an apiary for internal beekeepers. It has grown to embody 25 beehives and a abounding pollinator garden.

The village apiary during Hudson Gardens, nearby Littleton, Colo., was determined in 2009. Beekeepers contingency go by an focus process. Instead of a fee, members determine to tend a pollinator garden and attend in during slightest 4 overdo programs to teach visitors about honeybees.

Courtesy of Hudson Gardens


hide caption

toggle caption

Courtesy of Hudson Gardens

The village apiary during Hudson Gardens, nearby Littleton, Colo., was determined in 2009. Beekeepers contingency go by an focus process. Instead of a fee, members determine to tend a pollinator garden and attend in during slightest 4 overdo programs to teach visitors about honeybees.

Courtesy of Hudson Gardens

Community apiaries have also popped adult in cities like Chicago, Roxbury, N.Y., and Parry Sound, Ontario, Canada.

Hudson Gardens determined a village apiary in 2009. To secure a space, beekeepers contingency go by an focus process. Instead of a fee, members determine to tend a pollinator garden and attend in during slightest 4 overdo programs to teach visitors about honeybees.

“It’s a tiny joining for a advantage of operative alongside others who share a passion for beekeeping,” records Amanda Accamando, preparation and proffer manager during Hudson Gardens.

For commencement beekeepers, village apiaries offer some-more than usually support: Engman credits a beekeepers during Hudson Gardens for assisting her brand nosema, a illness that can clean out a hive.

“I had no thought what it was,” recalls Engman of a illness that left brownish-red streaks covering a outward of her hive. “The other beekeepers knew right divided and suggested treatments. It’s good to have easy entrance to all of that knowledge.”

Engman credits a village apiary with giving her a certainty and skills to enhance her beekeeping business. She now maintains 11 hives around Littleton, including dual during Hudson Gardens.

Beginning beekeepers are not a usually ones buzzing about village apiaries. The open bee yards can be a usually options for beekeepers who can't keep hives during home since of restrictions imposed by home owners associations or internal beekeeping laws.

Earlier this year, a city legislature in Yorkville, Ill., authorized a village apiary during a internal park to concede residents whose properties can't approve with internal beekeeping restrictions to say hives within a city limits. For a $25 annual fee, beekeepers can say adult to 3 hives per residential address. All hives contingency be purebred with a Illinois Department of Agriculture and beekeepers contingency keep guilt insurance.

As seductiveness grows, so do a series of applications for space in village apiaries. At Hudson Gardens, Accamando anticipates some-more applications from beekeepers than a apiary can accommodate. She hopes to supplement an additional village apiary site in a spring.

“Beekeepers mostly get artistic about anticipating spaces to put their hives, anticipating space during civic gardens, in cemeteries or on rooftops,” she explains. “It’s usually tough to find space, and that’s because village apiaries are so popular. The focus routine has gotten competitive.”

Despite a recognition of village apiaries, Accamando acknowledges that a indication has challenges: The vicinity of a hives to any other increases a odds that a illness inspiring one hive will widespread to another; bees can also “rob” weaker hives, putting a whole cluster during risk.

And, when apiaries are located in open spaces, like parks, there can be some alarm about open safety.

After training a village apiary was authorized for a internal park in Schaumburg, Ill., in 2013, a area proprietor who against a apiary told a Chicago Tribune, “My kids and a lot of a area kids [won’t be means to] play in a backyard.”

Despite a challenges, Tucker strongly supports substantiating village apiaries.

“Anything we can do to foster beekeeping, we contingency do,” he says. “It’s going to take village efforts to save a bees.”

Jodi Helmer is a North Carolina publisher and beekeeper who frequently writes about food and farming.