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A Man With A Bucket On His Head Ran To Unseat Theresa May. Why? Well …

British Prime Minister Theresa May stands between Lord Buckethead (right) and Elmo, given — well, given infrequently democracy is weird.

Alastair Grant/AP


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Alastair Grant/AP

British Prime Minister Theresa May stands between Lord Buckethead (right) and Elmo, given — well, given infrequently democracy is weird.

Alastair Grant/AP

You competence be wondering about a man wearing a bucket on his head.

That’s OK. When promote news outlets panned opposite a quarrel of possibilities station beside British Prime Minister Theresa May on choosing night in a U.K. — divulgence several respectable-looking gentlemen, afterwards a cape-draped figure but a face — a series of people had questions, only like you.

His name is Lord Buckethead. He ran to replace May as deputy of a Maidenhead constituency.

And he got 249 votes.

Which competence be surprising, given that a honest intergalactic space duke ran on some flattering radical positions — many of which, in loyal approved spirit, excepted him entirely. Here’s an abridged list of his rather endless platform:

  • The extermination of a Lords (except me) …
  • “Nationalisation of Adele: in sequence to maximize a fit use of UK resources, a time is right for good British resources to be brought into open tenure for a common good. This is to be achieved by collateral spending. …
  • “A duration until 2022 on either Birmingham should be converted into a star base. …
  • Stop offered arms to Saudi Arabia. Start shopping lasers from Lord Buckethead.”

He’s got a song video too, naturally.

Lord Buckethead’s coming was partial of something of a domestic tradition in a U.K., where it’s not odd for all of a possibilities for a sold parliamentary subdivision — no matter how, well, individualist — to mount side by side as a opinion is decided. That’s why, if we scanned only a small over along a line, we competence have beheld a chairman dressed in a hulk Elmo costume.

It’s also why, elsewhere in a country, a claimant called Mr. Fishfinger — who according to The Guardian altered his name by help check to take partial in a choosing — stood behind a night’s internal winner, Tim Farron.

Fishfinger got 309 votes, by a way.

And as a BBC notes, Lord Buckethead himself — or during slightest some chairman dressed as a starlord of buckets — has turn something of a tradition in his possess right. The broadcaster reports a impression has been around during slightest given 1987, when he took on another British primary minister, Margaret Thatcher. (And got 131 votes.)

Perhaps Buckethead pronounced it best when he sang, lyric voice muffled by his eminent bucket: “You never knew that space lords would do that.”