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40 Years After ‘Star Wars’ Error, Newspaper Apologizes To Wookiee Community

A male dressed in a Chewbacca dress throws his arms aloft in what can usually be a confounding brew of emotions: triumph, certain — though also moral indignation during all a decades mislaid to forward misspelling.

Elaine Thompson/AP


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Elaine Thompson/AP

A male dressed in a Chewbacca dress throws his arms aloft in what can usually be a confounding brew of emotions: triumph, certain — though also moral indignation during all a decades mislaid to forward misspelling.

Elaine Thompson/AP

Four decades ago Friday, The Dallas Morning News committed an blunder so grave, so egregious, that it prolonged remained hidden in overpower — out of a low clarity of contrition and self-recrimination that one can usually imagine.

The paper called Chewbacca a “Wookie.”

On Thursday, a 40th anniversary of a strange Star Wars’ release, editors nobly faced down a dim law of their institution’s past, edition a correction:

“Our examination of a strange Star Wars, that seemed in The Dallas Morning News on May 26, 1977, wrongly referred to Chewbacca as a ‘Wookie.’ The scold spelling, of course, is ‘Wookiee.’ We bewail a blunder and apologize to a seven-foot-tall hairy visitor biped community.”

Thank you, Morning News, for charity a indication of journalistic strictness and integrity.

Which brings us to a possess dim past: Roughly 7 years ago, we wrote a post about a trend that had strike Twitter during a time. It was a hashtag purporting to exhibit a deepest secrets of a Star Wars star — known, of course, as #WookieeLeaks.

Or is that #WookieLeaks?

'Wookieeleaks': Popular, It Is; Because 'Geeks Love To Go Deep On Things'

In a post we had it both ways, spelling it with dual E’s in a content and one E in a tab during a bottom of a page. And it appears we weren’t alone: Both spellings of a hashtag have had adherents for years. (It’s still not wholly transparent that is right.)

But before we get too mislaid in this tangled web of abbreviation and galaxies, here’s a word from a publisher behind that post: Mark Memmott, co-founder of The Two-Way blog and now NPR’s standards and practices editor.

“As Yoda competence say, ‘make mistakes, we too have.’ Can we clear it by observant that a tab ‘wookieleaks’ is some-more useful to a infancy of users given so many of us customarily leave off a second E? Would we buy that forgive from any of The Two-Way’s stream correspondents? (No.)”

So while some questions linger, one law remains: We take shortcoming for a spelling here on this blog. Got that, Chewbaccca?